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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: Fruit Fly Fear

Fruit Fly Fear

By | May 15, 2015

Drosophila exhibit component behaviors of the fear response, suggesting that researchers might use the model organisms to investigate the neural underpinnings of the emotion.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: New Epigenetic Mark Found on Metazoan DNA

New Epigenetic Mark Found on Metazoan DNA

By | April 30, 2015

Three studies identify roles for N6-methyladenosine in algae, worms, and flies.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Metabolic Memory

Metabolic Memory

By | April 8, 2015

Drosophila develop preferences for healthy foods that can be disrupted by overfeeding, a study suggests.

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image: Insulin Interference Triggers Cancer-Linked Cachexia

Insulin Interference Triggers Cancer-Linked Cachexia

By | April 6, 2015

A tumor-secreted protein interferes with insulin signaling to cause cancer-linked muscle wasting in fruit flies. 

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