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image: Hand Signs for Science

Hand Signs for Science

By | December 5, 2012

Organizations are calling for a common set of sign language for scientific terms.


image: Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild

Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild

By | December 1, 2012

In the introduction to his latest book, renowned naturalist George Schaller describes the evolving role of the field biologist through the lens of his experiences with Himalayan wildlife.


image: Playing the Field

Playing the Field

By | December 1, 2012

The role of field biologists is changing as conservation biology evolves and ecological challenges mount.


image: A Blood Test for Cancer?

A Blood Test for Cancer?

By | November 30, 2012

Researchers are getting closer to detecting abnormal tumor DNA circulating in the bloodstream.


image: Art Through the Nose

Art Through the Nose

By | November 29, 2012

A new show at New York’s Museum of Art and Design celebrates olfaction and the science behind modern perfume making.


image: Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

By | November 28, 2012

In the largest microbial eukaryote genetic sequencing effort ever attempted, researchers are investigating the transcriptomes of 700 marine algae species.

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image: Opinion: Talking Genomics

Opinion: Talking Genomics

By | November 13, 2012

The crucial importance of language in the debate over the regulation of direct-to-consumer genetic tests

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image: Sandy’s Impact on Science

Sandy’s Impact on Science

By | November 5, 2012

More stories surface about how last week’s super storm is affecting research up and down the coast—and how science is fighting back.


image: Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

By | November 1, 2012

In Chapter 2, "Consequences and Evolution: The Cause That Works Backwards," author Susan M. Schneider places evolutionary theory in terms of the science of consequences.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2012

Spillover, Answers for Aristotle, Who’s in Charge? and Science Set Free

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