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image: Bacterial Sacrifice

Bacterial Sacrifice

By | January 1, 2013

Patterns of cell death aid in the formation of beneficial wrinkles during the development of bacterial biofilms.

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image: Going Boldly Forth

Going Boldly Forth

By | January 1, 2013

Gregory Hannon believes in taking risks—an approach that’s enabled him to make exciting new discoveries in the world of small RNAs.

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image: Sperm Shadows

Sperm Shadows

By | January 1, 2013

Tracking the shadows cast by sperm reveals their precise 3-D movements.

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image: Evolution by Splicing

Evolution by Splicing

By | December 20, 2012

Comparing gene transcripts from different species reveals surprising splicing diversity.

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image: Bones Get in Her Eyes

Bones Get in Her Eyes

By | December 20, 2012

After undergoing untested cosmetic surgery that uses stem cells to rejuvenate skin, a woman grew bone fragments in the flesh around one of her eyes.

2 Comments

image: Puerto Rico's Native Bird

Puerto Rico's Native Bird

By | December 17, 2012

The Carribean island, with the help of researchers using creative ways of getting the message out, has rallied behind sequencing the genome of an endemic parrot.

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image: Cancer More Diverse than Its Genetics

Cancer More Diverse than Its Genetics

By | December 13, 2012

Tumor cells can exhibit different behaviors despite being genetically indistinguishable.

4 Comments

image: 100,000 British Genomes

100,000 British Genomes

By | December 10, 2012

A new initiative lead by the UK’s National Health Service aims to sequence the genomes of as many as 100,000 patients, a project that will cost £100 million.

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image: Detailing Color Vision

Detailing Color Vision

By | December 6, 2012

Scientists engineer a spectrum of artificial pigments to understand how animals see in color.

1 Comment

image: Fat's Immune Sentinels

Fat's Immune Sentinels

By | December 1, 2012

Certain immune cells keep adipose tissue in check by helping to define normal and abnormal physiological states.

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