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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | February 22, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Detecting Lyme Early

Detecting Lyme Early

By | February 12, 2016

Two new methods could help researchers to diagnose Lyme disease earlier than with existing tests.

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image: Ancient Irish

Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.

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image: Year in Review: Spotlight on Ancient DNA

Year in Review: Spotlight on Ancient DNA

By | December 30, 2015

Several studies using centuries-old genetic material graced the pages of life-science journals in 2015. Here’s a look at a few of the researchers and papers that made headlines this year.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Top 10 Innovations 2015

Top 10 Innovations 2015

By | December 1, 2015

The newest life-science products making waves in labs and clinics

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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