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PerkinElmer

The Scientist

» sequencing and developmental biology

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image: Mapping NYC's Microbes

Mapping NYC's Microbes

By | December 1, 2013

New York University’s Jane Carlton talks about a project designed to characterize the microbiome of the Big Apple.

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image: Metropolome

Metropolome

By | December 1, 2013

Researchers take advantage of rapid and cheap DNA sequencing technologies to map the bacterial microbiome of New York City.

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image: Two-time Nobel Laureate Dies

Two-time Nobel Laureate Dies

By | November 20, 2013

Frederick Sanger, who pioneered amino acid and DNA sequencing techniques, has passed away at age 95.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: Genetic Diversity in the Brain

Genetic Diversity in the Brain

By | October 31, 2013

Neurons within a person’s brain exhibit striking variations in DNA copy number.

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image: Scientists Confirm Bats Carry SARS

Scientists Confirm Bats Carry SARS

By | October 31, 2013

Whole-genome sequences for two novel coronaviruses from Chinese horseshoe bats are the most closely related to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus to date.

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Opinion: Standards Needed

Opinion: Standards Needed

By | September 18, 2013

The success of genome sequencing hinges on technology standardization and coordinated efforts among scientists, bioinformaticians, and physicians.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

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