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image: Kennewick Man Was Native American

Kennewick Man Was Native American

By | June 18, 2015

Genomic analysis suggests that the skeleton’s closest living relatives are Native American after all.

3 Comments

image: MERS Sequence Analysis

MERS Sequence Analysis

By | June 11, 2015

The strain of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus currently circulating in South Korea is highly similar to the one in the pathogen’s namesake region.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: 2015 Top 10 Innovations: Enter Today!

2015 Top 10 Innovations: Enter Today!

By | April 13, 2015

Submissions are officially open for this year’s Top 10 Innovations contest.

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image: Hiding in Plain Sight

Hiding in Plain Sight

By | March 31, 2015

Researchers using metagenomics and single-cell sequencing identify a potential new bacterial phylum.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

1 Comment

image: Subway Microbiome

Subway Microbiome

By | February 9, 2015

Researchers document the bacterial life living among New York City’s transit stations.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2015

Does Altruism Exist?, Ancestors in Our Genome, Fred Sanger—Double Nobel Laureate, and Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

1 Comment

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