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» cloning, immunology and evolution

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image: A Reprogramming Histone

A Reprogramming Histone

By | October 29, 2012

The scientist who pioneered cloning has found that a histone may act as a cellular reset button.  

3 Comments

image: Bacterial Cocktail Treats Infection

Bacterial Cocktail Treats Infection

By | October 29, 2012

Mice fed a mix of six strains of bacteria were able to fight a C. difficile infection that causes deadly diarrhea and is resistant to most types of treatment.

2 Comments

image: Ancient Viruses Wreak New Havoc

Ancient Viruses Wreak New Havoc

By | October 24, 2012

Viral DNA in mice genomes may lead to cancer in immune-compromised animals.

0 Comments

image: Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

By | October 23, 2012

Genes from fungi, bacteria, and viruses may have helped mosses and other plants to colonize the land.

2 Comments

image: Cloning Biologist Dies

Cloning Biologist Dies

By | October 12, 2012

Keith Campbell, a biologist who was part of the effort to clone Dolly the sheep, has passed away at the age of 58.

1 Comment

image: Cell Re-Programmers Take the Nobel

Cell Re-Programmers Take the Nobel

By | October 8, 2012

John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka win this year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine for learning how to reboot cellular development. 

7 Comments

image: The Salinella salve Mystery

The Salinella salve Mystery

By | October 1, 2012

Salinella salve, an organism described as a single layer of cells, ciliated on both inner and outer surfaces and surrounding…

0 Comments

image: Drug Allergy in the Pocket

Drug Allergy in the Pocket

By | October 1, 2012

An HIV drug can bind to and alter the function of an immune molecule, causing a dangerous reaction in patients with a particular allele.

0 Comments

image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.

3 Comments

image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

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