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image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

4 Comments

image: Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

By | October 20, 2013

An immune suppressive drug can unexpectedly help immunized mice fight off many strains of flu.

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image: Influential Ecologist Dies

Influential Ecologist Dies

By | September 24, 2013

Ruth Patrick, who pioneered freshwater pollution monitoring, has passed away at age 105.

1 Comment

image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

2 Comments

image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

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image: Research Behind Bars

Research Behind Bars

By | July 1, 2013

Ecologist Nalini Nadkarni advances forest conservation and science advocacy by enlisting the help of prisoners.

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image: Science on Lockdown

Science on Lockdown

By | July 1, 2013

A forest ecologist comes down from the canopy to bring science to the masses, forming a series of improbable collaborations with prisoners.

3 Comments

image: Sea Bugs

Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.

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image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.

3 Comments

image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.

3 Comments

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