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image: Killer Kittens

Killer Kittens

By | January 31, 2013

Domestic cats kill billions of birds and mammals every year, making them a top threat to US wildlife.

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image: Modeling All Life?

Modeling All Life?

By | January 28, 2013

A proposal to simulate all of Earth’s ecosystems is exposing a rift between small and big ecology.

5 Comments

image: Cities Affect Global Weather Currents

Cities Affect Global Weather Currents

By | January 28, 2013

The heat emanating from large metropolitan areas may be changing weather patterns thousands of miles away.

1 Comment

image: Universal Flu Vaccines Charge Ahead

Universal Flu Vaccines Charge Ahead

By | January 14, 2013

Researchers and biotech companies are bringing a universal flu vaccine closer to reality.

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image: Fly Guts Reveal Animal Inventory

Fly Guts Reveal Animal Inventory

By | January 7, 2013

Stomachs of flesh-eating flies carry the DNA of animals in remote rainforests.

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image: Fighting Microbes with Microbes

Fighting Microbes with Microbes

By | January 1, 2013

Doctors turn to good microbes to fight disease. Will the same strategy work with crops?

6 Comments

image: Limber LIMS

Limber LIMS

By | January 1, 2013

Using laboratory information management systems (LIMS) to automate and streamline laboratory tasks: three case studies

1 Comment

image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

1 Comment

image: Adipose Tissue Metabolism in the Obese

Adipose Tissue Metabolism in the Obese

By | December 12, 2012

Fat cells behave differently in obese individuals, causing inflammation and insulin resitance.

1 Comment

image: Old Ocean Mold

Old Ocean Mold

By | December 12, 2012

Fungi in 100 million year-old seafloor sediments could possess novel antibiotics.

0 Comments

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