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image: Reviving an Extinct Pigeon

Reviving an Extinct Pigeon

By | March 18, 2013

The passenger pigeon was hunted to extinction 99 years ago, but researchers are planning to use DNA from museum specimens to bring the bird back to life.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2013

March 2013's selection of notable quotes


image: A Reprogramming Histone

A Reprogramming Histone

By | October 29, 2012

The scientist who pioneered cloning has found that a histone may act as a cellular reset button.  


image: Cloning Biologist Dies

Cloning Biologist Dies

By | October 12, 2012

Keith Campbell, a biologist who was part of the effort to clone Dolly the sheep, has passed away at the age of 58.

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image: Cell Re-Programmers Take the Nobel

Cell Re-Programmers Take the Nobel

By | October 8, 2012

John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka win this year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine for learning how to reboot cellular development. 


image: Move Over, Mother Nature

Move Over, Mother Nature

By | July 1, 2012

Synthetic biologists harness software to design genes and networks.


image: Building a Better Sheep

Building a Better Sheep

By | April 25, 2012

Chinese scientists claim to have cloned a lamb carrying a roundworm gene that aids in the production of polyunsaturated fatty acids.


image: Self-cloning Coral

Self-cloning Coral

By | March 1, 2012

Coral embryos broken apart by waves can continue developing into adult clones.


image: Coral Clones

Coral Clones

By | March 1, 2012

The colorful and fragile start to the life of a living reef


image: Modern Day Mammoth?

Modern Day Mammoth?

By | December 6, 2011

Researchers at Japanese and Russian institutions believe cloning a woolly mammoth is within reach.


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