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The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

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image: New Gecko-Inspired Adhesive

New Gecko-Inspired Adhesive

By | April 6, 2016

Flexible patches of silicone that stick to skin and conduct electricity could serve as the basis for a new, reusable electrode for medical applications.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: RoboSpleen

RoboSpleen

By | August 1, 2015

Witness a bioinspired device developed by researchers at Harvard’s Wyss Institute to treat sepsis.

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image: Inspired by Nature

Inspired by Nature

By | August 1, 2015

Researchers are borrowing designs from the natural world to advance biomedicine.

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image: Mollusk Mockup

Mollusk Mockup

By | February 1, 2015

Researchers develop a “micro-scallop” meant to glide through biological fluids by opening and closing a pair of silicone shells.

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image: Shell Games

Shell Games

By | February 1, 2015

See how scallop locomotion informed the design of a microscopic robot that could one day navigate our circulatory systems.

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image: Sonic Experiment

Sonic Experiment

By | January 29, 2015

An artist takes advantage of muscle-mimicking polymers to manipulate sounds.

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image: Shrimp-Inspired Cancer Camera

Shrimp-Inspired Cancer Camera

By | October 6, 2014

Researchers have developed a tumor imaging device based upon the visual system of a crustacean.

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image: Squid-Inspired Electric Elastomer

Squid-Inspired Electric Elastomer

By | September 18, 2014

Polymer changes color and texture in response to remote signals. 

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