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image: Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

By | March 1, 2012

Take a tour through the revolutionary menthod's past, present, and future.

8 Comments

image: Promoting Death

Promoting Death

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in biochemistry

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image: The Subcellular World Revealed, 1945

The Subcellular World Revealed, 1945

By | March 1, 2012

The first electron microscope to peer into an intact cell ushers in the new field of cell biology.

4 Comments

image: Ovarian Stem Cells in Humans?

Ovarian Stem Cells in Humans?

By | February 27, 2012

Adult human ovaries contain a population of stem cells capable of generating immature egg cells.

7 Comments

image: New Kind of Cellular Suicide

New Kind of Cellular Suicide

By | February 23, 2012

Researchers identify a gene that drives a type of cellular suicide that differs from the more commonly observed apoptosis phenomenon.

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image: Long Live the Y

Long Live the Y

By | February 22, 2012

Despite suggestions to the contrary, the Y chromosome is not necessarily rotting away.

8 Comments

image: How Tigers Get Their Stripes

How Tigers Get Their Stripes

By | February 22, 2012

For the first time researchers have demonstrated the molecular tango that gives rise to repeating patterns in developing animal embryos.

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image: Alzheimer's Drugs Harmful?

Alzheimer's Drugs Harmful?

By | February 20, 2012

The researcher who helped develop an Alzheimer's treatment now in clinical trials warns that the compound may actually impair memory.

2 Comments

image: Zooming into Life

Zooming into Life

By | February 16, 2012

Teenagers create a program that lets viewers compare the sizes of things on earth and in space.

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image: Propitious Prions

Propitious Prions

By | February 15, 2012

Often thought to be artifacts of the lab, prions in yeast may actually drive the evolution of beneficial traits.

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