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image: Multiple Sclerosis: Is Yawning a Warning?

Multiple Sclerosis: Is Yawning a Warning?

By | September 1, 2016

Neuropsychologist Simon Thompson found a possible link between yawning and multiple sclerosis. So what better way to get under the skin of his research than volunteering to take part in one of his experiments?

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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image: Orchid Bees Use Simple Eyes to Detect Polarized Light

Orchid Bees Use Simple Eyes to Detect Polarized Light

By | September 1, 2016

The second visual field may aid in navigation.

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Neurons in the lamprey spinal cord can sense pH and counteract changes from the body’s optimal range.

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image: Profile: Dean Buonomano Studies How the Brain Encodes Time

Profile: Dean Buonomano Studies How the Brain Encodes Time

By | September 1, 2016

The UCLA neurobiologist uses computational modeling, in vitro electrophysiology, and human psychophysics experiments to explore how neurons and the brain as a whole perceive and respond to time.

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image: Smart Skin Enables Magnetoreception

Smart Skin Enables Magnetoreception

By | September 1, 2016

Researchers develop a wearable technology that can detect magnetic fields and translate the signal into a visual display—a first step toward equipping humans with an entirely new sense.

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image: Sensory Biology Around the Animal Kingdom

Sensory Biology Around the Animal Kingdom

By | September 1, 2016

From detecting gravity and the Earth’s magnetic field to feeling heat and the movement of water around them, animals can do more than just see, smell, touch, taste, and hear.

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image: Opinion: Acquiring Extra Senses

Opinion: Acquiring Extra Senses

By | September 1, 2016

Animals’ diverse sensory abilities will guide a technology-based revolution that gives humans perception beyond our natural senses.

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image: Dogs Respond to Words and Inflection

Dogs Respond to Words and Inflection

By | August 31, 2016

Using an MRI scanner to examine how dogs’ brains process speech, researchers find that our canine companions hear both what we say and how we say it. 

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“Ultimate DISCO” uses a solvent that shrinks whole animals and preserves fluorescence for months.

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