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image: Thirty Years of Lab Safety

Thirty Years of Lab Safety

By | October 1, 2016

From mouth pipetting to automated liquid handling, life-science labs have gotten much safer over the past three decades.

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image: Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

By | September 28, 2016

More papers correlate with top-cited research for more-established academics, but not newly minted professors, according to a study.  

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image: A Panoply of Animal Senses

A Panoply of Animal Senses

By | September 1, 2016

Animals have receptors for feeling gravity, fluid flow, heat, and electric and magnetic fields.

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image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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image: A Cornucopia of Sensory Perception

A Cornucopia of Sensory Perception

By | September 1, 2016

Forget what you learned about humans having five senses. That goes double for non-human animals.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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image: Smart Skin Enables Magnetoreception

Smart Skin Enables Magnetoreception

By | September 1, 2016

Researchers develop a wearable technology that can detect magnetic fields and translate the signal into a visual display—a first step toward equipping humans with an entirely new sense.

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image: Sensory Biology Around the Animal Kingdom

Sensory Biology Around the Animal Kingdom

By | September 1, 2016

From detecting gravity and the Earth’s magnetic field to feeling heat and the movement of water around them, animals can do more than just see, smell, touch, taste, and hear.

3 Comments

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