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» magnetoreception and evolution

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image: Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

By | June 9, 2016

Fish evolved to make their own light at least 27 times, according to a study.

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A transposon underlies this classic story of evolutionary adaptation.

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image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.


Caltech’s Frances Arnold is honored for her work on directed evolution.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 17, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes  


image: Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

By | May 12, 2016

Researchers uncover the first example of a eukaryotic organism that lacks the organelles.


image: Animal Magnetism

Animal Magnetism

By | May 1, 2016

A photosensitive protein behind the retinas of cockroaches plays a role in light-dependent, directional magnetosensitivity.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees


image: Feeling Around in the Dark

Feeling Around in the Dark

By | May 1, 2016

Scientists work to unlock the genetic secrets of a population of fruit flies kept in total darkness for more than six decades.


image: Monkey See, Monkey Die

Monkey See, Monkey Die

By | May 1, 2016

What's killing howler monkeys in the jungles of Central America?


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