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image: Baby on Board

Baby on Board

By | September 1, 2017

Many scientific conferences offer child care options that allow researchers to bring their families along for the trip.

1 Comment

image: Living Fabric

Living Fabric

By | September 1, 2017

See the bacteria-powered, breathable clothing made by former MIT researcher Wen Wang and colleagues.

2 Comments

image: So You’ve Been Mistaken as a White Nationalist

So You’ve Been Mistaken as a White Nationalist

By | August 18, 2017

Biomedical engineer Kyle Quinn fends off a frenzied Internet mob after being wrongly identified as a Charlottesville protester.

9 Comments

image: First Organ-Specific Tissue Sheets

First Organ-Specific Tissue Sheets

By | August 9, 2017

The material is durable, flexible, and can serve as a scaffold for cell growth, a study shows.

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image: Engineered Human Liver Tissue Grows in Mice

Engineered Human Liver Tissue Grows in Mice

By | July 19, 2017

Tissue “seeds” made up of three cell types and patterned onto a scaffold develop into complex structures with some organ function, researchers show.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

6 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

1 Comment

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