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The Scientist

» bioengineering and culture

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image: Casting a Small Net

Casting a Small Net

By | June 10, 2015

Scientists inject flexible, electronic mesh structures into mouse brains to track neurons in real time.

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image: Limbs in the Lab

Limbs in the Lab

By | June 8, 2015

Scientists bioengineer rat arms and hands from scaffolds stripped of their cellular material.

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In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2015

How to Clone a Mammoth, The Upright Thinkers, The Thirteenth Step, and Humankind

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image: Reimagining Humanity

Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.

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image: Alternate Pathways Yield New Antibiotics

Alternate Pathways Yield New Antibiotics

By | May 29, 2015

Scientists tinker with biosynthetic pathways to make versions of a common antibiotic that stunt drug-resistant bacteria.

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While some in the scientific and religious communities have declared an end to the tensions between faith and fact, the conflict continues to have impacts on health, politics, and the environment.

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image: Mouse Mind Control

Mouse Mind Control

By | May 4, 2015

Researchers use chemicals to manipulate the behavior of mice.

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image: Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

By | May 1, 2015

A close cooperation between science, politics, and economics has helped to control one of history’s most destructive epidemics.  

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2015

The Genealogy of a Gene, On the Move, The Chimp and the River, and Domesticated

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