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» bioengineering and developmental biology

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image: Loss of Potential

Loss of Potential

By | June 1, 2013

In the fruit fly, the ability of neural stem cells to make the full repertoire of neurons is regulated by the movement of key genes to the nuclear periphery.

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image: Epigenetics of Embryonic Stem Cells

Epigenetics of Embryonic Stem Cells

By | May 14, 2013

Researchers track DNA modifications and gene expression in stem cells as they differentiate.

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image: Toddler Gets Synthetic Windpipe

Toddler Gets Synthetic Windpipe

By | May 1, 2013

Doctors culture a custom-made trachea from plastic fibers and human cells, and successfully implant it into a child who was born without the organ.

2 Comments

image: The Organist

The Organist

By | May 1, 2013

When molecular biology methods failed her, Sangeeta Bhatia turned to engineering and microfabrication to build a liver from scratch.

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image: Lab-grown Kidneys Work in Rats

Lab-grown Kidneys Work in Rats

By | April 17, 2013

Bioengineered kidneys transplanted into rats filter blood and produce urine, an achievement that points the way to replacement kidneys for humans.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: Teasing Out New Teeth

Teasing Out New Teeth

By | March 12, 2013

Researchers mix cells from human adult gum tissue with tooth-inducing cells from mouse embryos to grow new hybrid teeth complete with roots.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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