Advertisement
Amazon
Amazon

The Scientist

» bioengineering and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 10–14

Week in Review: November 10–14

By | November 14, 2014

Funding for African science; microbiome studies may have contamination worries; mind-controlled gene expression; DNA record keeper

0 Comments

image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

0 Comments

image: High-Tech Yogurt Could Detect Disease

High-Tech Yogurt Could Detect Disease

By | October 16, 2014

Nanoparticle-producing bacteria may simplify the diagnosis of cancer and other medical conditions.

2 Comments

image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Joining Forces

Joining Forces

By | September 24, 2014

Bioengineers combine mussel and bacterial proteins to make waterproof glue.

1 Comment

image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Lab-Grown 3-D Brain Tissue Mimics Cortex

Lab-Grown 3-D Brain Tissue Mimics Cortex

By | August 11, 2014

From cortical neurons, researchers have engineered rat tissue that formed complex networks of functioning neurons and appeared to behave normally after an injury.

0 Comments

image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

0 Comments

Advertisement
Lonza Group
Lonza Group

Popular Now

  1. Antibody Maker Loses License Over Animal Welfare Violations
  2. ORI: Researcher Faked Dozens of Experiments
    The Nutshell ORI: Researcher Faked Dozens of Experiments

    A former scientist at the University of Michigan and the University of Chicago made up more than 70 experiments on heart cells, according to the Office of Research Integrity.

  3. Exploring Emotional Contagion
  4. Immune Defect Detected in Knockout Mice
Advertisement
R&D Systems
R&D Systems
Advertisement
LabX
LabX
Biosearch Technologies
illumina Corporate
illumina Corporate