The Scientist

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image: Mouse Mind Control

Mouse Mind Control

By | May 4, 2015

Researchers use chemicals to manipulate the behavior of mice.

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image: Bacterial Taxis Deliver Proteins

Bacterial Taxis Deliver Proteins

By | April 28, 2015

Reengineered protein-shuttling machinery can be used to inject a particular protein into mammalian cells, according to a proof-of-principle study.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

1 Comment

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Polymer Pioneer Honored

Polymer Pioneer Honored

By | February 4, 2015

Robert Langer, an engineer at MIT who fundamentally changed drug delivery, is awarded £1 million for the Queen Elizabeth Prize.

1 Comment

image: Engineer of Change

Engineer of Change

By | February 1, 2015

A chemical engineer walks into a biology lab . . . and revolutionizes bioengineering. How Robert Langer blazed a trail in drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

2 Comments

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

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