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image: Limbs in the Lab

Limbs in the Lab

By | June 8, 2015

Scientists bioengineer rat arms and hands from scaffolds stripped of their cellular material.

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image: Alternate Pathways Yield New Antibiotics

Alternate Pathways Yield New Antibiotics

By | May 29, 2015

Scientists tinker with biosynthetic pathways to make versions of a common antibiotic that stunt drug-resistant bacteria.

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image: Mouse Mind Control

Mouse Mind Control

By | May 4, 2015

Researchers use chemicals to manipulate the behavior of mice.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Bacterial Taxis Deliver Proteins

Bacterial Taxis Deliver Proteins

By | April 28, 2015

Reengineered protein-shuttling machinery can be used to inject a particular protein into mammalian cells, according to a proof-of-principle study.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Polymer Pioneer Honored

Polymer Pioneer Honored

By | February 4, 2015

Robert Langer, an engineer at MIT who fundamentally changed drug delivery, is awarded £1 million for the Queen Elizabeth Prize.

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image: Engineer of Change

Engineer of Change

By | February 1, 2015

A chemical engineer walks into a biology lab . . . and revolutionizes bioengineering. How Robert Langer blazed a trail in drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

1 Comment

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