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image: Engineered Human Liver Tissue Grows in Mice

Engineered Human Liver Tissue Grows in Mice

By | July 19, 2017

Tissue “seeds” made up of three cell types and patterned onto a scaffold develop into complex structures with some organ function, researchers show.

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image: Bacterial Photography Goes Technicolor

Bacterial Photography Goes Technicolor

By | May 22, 2017

Genetically engineered "disco bacteria" sense and respond to different colors of light, creating both stunning art in the culture dish and new possibilities for synthetic biology.

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image: Synthetic Bones: A Better Bone-Marrow Transplant?

Synthetic Bones: A Better Bone-Marrow Transplant?

By | May 9, 2017

Artificial bones produce new blood cells in mice, obviating the need for irradiation to kill off resident hematopoietic stem cells in recipients.

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image: Ancient Protein Helps <em>E. coli</em> Thwart Viral Attack

Ancient Protein Helps E. coli Thwart Viral Attack

By | May 9, 2017

When engineered to use a four-billion-year-old version of the protein thioredoxin, the bacteria can stall bacteriophage replication, a new study shows.

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image: Phosphorylation at the Flick of a Switch

Phosphorylation at the Flick of a Switch

By | May 1, 2017

Incorporating light-controlled dimerization domains into kinases provides tight regulation of these enzymes.

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image: Infographic: Enzymes Controlled by Light

Infographic: Enzymes Controlled by Light

By | May 1, 2017

Custom-designed kinases have built-in switches that act as gatekeepers for the enzymes' active sites.

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Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

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image: Protein or Perish

Protein or Perish

By | September 1, 2016

A bacteriophage must evolve certain variants of a protein or die.

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image: Spider Silk “Superlens” Breaks Microscopy Barrier

Spider Silk “Superlens” Breaks Microscopy Barrier

By | August 24, 2016

Scientists improve upon the optical microscope using a readily available natural material.

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image: Bacterial Baddies

Bacterial Baddies

By | August 1, 2016

Scientist to Watch Cullen Buie, MIT researcher, talks about his quest to devise a method for quickly determining the pathogenicity of microbes.

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