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image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

9 Comments

image: Animal Mind Control

Animal Mind Control

By | January 1, 2012

Examples of parasites that manipulate the behavior of their hosts are not hard to come by, but scientists have only recently begun to understand how they induce such dramatic changes.

40 Comments

image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

3 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.

6 Comments

image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42

5 Comments

image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 

3 Comments

image: Flow Cytometry for the Masses

Flow Cytometry for the Masses

By | December 1, 2011

Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.

3 Comments

image: Ladybug Zombies

Ladybug Zombies

By | October 31, 2011

Wasps inject their larvae into ladybug abdomens, where they feast on the bugs’ insides.

0 Comments

image: <em>Wolbachia</em> Boost Stem Cell Production

Wolbachia Boost Stem Cell Production

By | October 20, 2011

The widespread bacteria known to manipulate host reproductive output can do so by ramping up stem cell division and consequent egg production in Drosophila.

3 Comments

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