The Scientist

» parasite and ecology

Most Recent

image: Sea Bugs

Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.


image: Sticking Power

Sticking Power

By | July 1, 2013

An adhesive inspired by a parasitic worm could help better affix skin grafts in burn patients.


image: Worm Bandage

Worm Bandage

By | July 1, 2013

Biomimicry yields a new type of patch that may help wounds heal faster.


image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.


image: Bird Bullies

Bird Bullies

By | June 1, 2013

Regular supplies of food for scavenger birds in Spain may not be the most effective conservation strategy, as smaller birds are bullied away.

1 Comment

image: Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

By | June 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia. Age: 34

1 Comment

image: Salamander Evolution

Salamander Evolution

By | June 1, 2013

Yale University evolutionary biologist Steven Brady studies the evolutionary impacts of roads on the amphibians.


Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.


image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.


image: Malarial Mosquitos Drawn to Human Smell

Malarial Mosquitos Drawn to Human Smell

By | May 17, 2013

Mosquitos infected by the malaria parasite are more likely to land on and probe a substrate laced with human body odor than their uninfected counterparts.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Rethinking the Rise of Mammals
    Daily News Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

    Mammals diversified 30 million years later than previously estimated, according to a new analysis of an ancient fossil.

  2. Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity
  3. Birth of the Skin Microbiome
    Daily News Birth of the Skin Microbiome

    The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

  4. Battling the Bulge
    Bio Business Battling the Bulge

    Weight-loss drugs that target newly characterized obesity-related receptors and pathways could finally offer truly effective fat control.

Life Technologies