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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Opinion: Toot Your Horn

Opinion: Toot Your Horn

By | October 6, 2016

Why (and how) scientists should advocate for their research with journalists and policymakers

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image: Q&A: From FDA to Industry

Q&A: From FDA to Industry

By | September 27, 2016

Among a subset of US Food and Drug Administration regulators who leave the agency, more than half go to work for pharmaceutical companies, researchers report.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: Male Docs in Academia Earn More: Study

Male Docs in Academia Earn More: Study

By | July 12, 2016

Female physicians working at medical schools in the U.S. make about $51,000 less than their male counterparts on average.

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image: Learning Bioinformatics

Learning Bioinformatics

By | July 1, 2016

In today’s data-heavy research environment, wet-lab scientists can benefit from new computational skills.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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