The Scientist

» careers and disease/medicine

Most Recent

Oncologists have raised concerns about a mouse study that suggests the vaccine for human papillomavirus could cause brain damage.

0 Comments

image: US Postdocs Grapple with Salary Changes

US Postdocs Grapple with Salary Changes

By | December 16, 2016

Postdocs nationwide were set to have an increased minimum salary or become eligible for overtime pay until a court injunction halted new Department of Labor regulations.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: The Scientist’s Scarlet Letter

Opinion: The Scientist’s Scarlet Letter

By | December 16, 2016

Managing privacy protections and expectations in a misconduct proceeding

0 Comments

image: Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

By | December 1, 2016

Successful late-stage clinical trials could mark the maturation of a new drug development platform, but the path to commercialization is not without hurdles.

0 Comments

Mentoring is critical for students just beginning to learn the ropes of biomedical research.

5 Comments

image: More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

By | November 9, 2016

Researchers say they have sufficient in vitro and animal data to apply for human testing.

0 Comments

image: Predicting Scientific Success

Predicting Scientific Success

By | November 3, 2016

A scientist’s most influential paper may come at any point in her career but chances are it won’t change her overall success, researchers show.

0 Comments

Family members with a certain gene variant had unnecessary interventions, highlighting the potential hazards of precision medicine.

2 Comments

image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | October 24, 2016

Virus’s effect on RNA methylation; identifying brain cells targeted by Zika; virus found in vaginal secretions for two weeks after infection; updated CDC recommendations for Miami

0 Comments

image: Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

By | October 19, 2016

Researchers discover that neutrophil extracellular traps help cancers spread, and design enzyme-loaded nanoparticles to destroy them.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Humans Never Stopped Evolving
    Features Humans Never Stopped Evolving

    The emergence of blood abnormalities, an adult ability to digest milk, and changes in our physical appearance point to the continued evolution of the human race.

  2. An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock
  3. Marching for Science, from Berlin to Sydney
  4. Abundant Sequence Errors in Public Databases
Business Birmingham