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image: Ketamine Alternative Shows Promise

Ketamine Alternative Shows Promise

By | October 17, 2013

Researchers show that lanicemine is an effective antidepressant without the adverse effects of the related hallucinogenic drug.

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image: Opinion: Honorary Authorship Is Antiquated Etiquette

Opinion: Honorary Authorship Is Antiquated Etiquette

By | October 16, 2013

Though the practice may be well-intentioned, naming courtesy authors can hurt science and scientists.

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image: Opinion: How to Give Better Talks

Opinion: How to Give Better Talks

By | October 8, 2013

Eight ways to improve your biomedical research presentation

5 Comments

image: Federally Funded Researchers Fear Shutdown Delays

Federally Funded Researchers Fear Shutdown Delays

By | October 2, 2013

As the US government shutdown enters its second day, scientists who rely on federal grants to continue their work and support their staffs and students express frustration. 

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image: Bonding in the Lab

Bonding in the Lab

By | October 1, 2013

How to make your lab less like a factory and more like a family

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Evolution and Medicine</em>

Book Excerpt from Evolution and Medicine

By | October 1, 2013

In Chapter 11, “Man-made diseases,” author Robert Perlman describes how socioeconomic health disparities arise in hierarchical societies.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Get a Whiff of This

Get a Whiff of This

By | October 1, 2013

An issue devoted to the latest research on how smells lead to actions

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image: The Leprosy Bacillus, circa 1873

The Leprosy Bacillus, circa 1873

By | October 1, 2013

A scientist’s desperate attempts to prove that Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy landed him on trial, but his insights into the disease’s pathology were eventually vindicated.

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image: Three-Way Parenthood

Three-Way Parenthood

By , , and | October 1, 2013

Avoiding the transmission of mitochondrial disease takes a trio, but raises a host of logistical issues.

2 Comments

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