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image: The 2014 Salary Survey Is Here

The 2014 Salary Survey Is Here

By | March 10, 2014

Take our survey to help us determine the most current salary data for life scientists.

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Venter's New Venture

Venter's New Venture

By | March 5, 2014

The genomics pioneer is starting a new company that aims to tackle the mysteries of human aging.

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A butterfly’s varied disguises are controlled by variants of a single gene, partially confirming—and refuting—a decades-old hypothesis.

8 Comments

image: More Mutations in Girls with Autism

More Mutations in Girls with Autism

By | March 4, 2014

A greater number of genetic mutations among autistic girls, compared to their male counterparts, suggests that the female brain can better handle such variations.  

1 Comment

image: Collaboration Bias?

Collaboration Bias?

By | March 3, 2014

Study finds that male full professors are more likely than high-ranking female academics to collaborate with more junior colleagues of the same sex.

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image: Dad’s Contribution

Dad’s Contribution

By | February 28, 2014

Older fathers may have children with higher risk of psychiatric disorders, according to a study.

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image: Week in Review: February 24–28

Week in Review: February 24–28

By | February 28, 2014

New PLOS data sharing rules; mouse cortical connectome published; reprogramming astrocytes into neurons and fibroblasts into hepatocytes

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image: Plants Without Plastid Genomes

Plants Without Plastid Genomes

By | February 28, 2014

Two independent teams point to different plants that may have lost their plastid genomes.

1 Comment

image: Report: Diversity Strengthens Publications

Report: Diversity Strengthens Publications

By | February 25, 2014

US scientists are more likely to coauthor papers with researchers of similar ethnicity to themselves, but manuscripts with a more diverse list of authors have greater impact, a study shows.

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