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image: Life Below the Seabed

Life Below the Seabed

By | March 14, 2013

Rock samples from deep within the Earth’s oceanic crust contain chemosynthetic microbial life.

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image: Roller Derby Players Share Germs

Roller Derby Players Share Germs

By | March 14, 2013

Team member and opponents exchange microbes by slamming into each others’ shoulders during the game.

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image: Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

By | March 12, 2013

Nanoparticles coated with a toxin found in bee venom can destroy HIV while leaving surrounding cells intact.

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image: Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

By | March 7, 2013

A red alga appears to have adapted to extremely hot, acidic environments by collecting genes from bacteria and archaea.

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image: Salt at Fault?

Salt at Fault?

By | March 6, 2013

Two groups of researchers independently showed that high salt exposure stimulates cells implicated in multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases.

3 Comments

image: Insect Wing Kills Bacteria

Insect Wing Kills Bacteria

By | March 6, 2013

The nanoscale structure of a clanger cicada’s wings destroys threatening microbes on contact.

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image: Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

By | March 2, 2013

The method to the dengue virus's maddening infectiousness.

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image: Bacterial Buddies

Bacterial Buddies

By | March 1, 2013

A chance encounter with a crab apple tree leads to the discovery of a new bacterial species and clues to the evolution of insect endosymbionts.

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image: Blue Biotech

Blue Biotech

By | March 1, 2013

Systems biologist Lone Gram describes her approach to combing the oceans for novel compounds that may be useful in the fight against pathogens.

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image: Sea Change

Sea Change

By | March 1, 2013

A normally land-based microbiologist sets sail to find the building blocks of novel antibiotics in marine bacteria.

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