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» autoimmune disease, culture and evolution

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image: A Fly on the Wall

A Fly on the Wall

By | July 19, 2013

A geneticist-turned-filmmaker is making a movie set in Columbia University’s famous Fly Room, where the foundations for modern genetics were laid.

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image: A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

By | July 18, 2013

The discovery of a new species of horned dinosaur supports the idea that similar but separate species evolved on the same landmass thanks to a natural barrier.  

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image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

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image: Gut Microbes Treat Illness

Gut Microbes Treat Illness

By | July 10, 2013

Oral administration of a cocktail of bacteria derived from the human gut reduces colitis and allergy-invoked diarrhea in mice.

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image: Maternal Antibodies Linked to Autism

Maternal Antibodies Linked to Autism

By | July 9, 2013

Some children with autism are born to mothers carrying antibodies that bind to proteins involved in brain development.

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In Chapter 3, “From Mating to Conception,” author Robert Martin explores the question of why humans and other primates frequently engage in sexual intercourse when females are not fertile.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2013

Denial, Probably Approximately Correct, Permanent Present Tense, and Against Their Will

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image: Widening the Fertile Window

Widening the Fertile Window

By | July 1, 2013

Women may be able to store viable sperm for longer than a week, thus contributing to apparent variability in pregnancy lengths.

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image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

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image: Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

By | June 26, 2013

By sequencing the genome of a 700,000-year-old horse, researchers have pushed back the time of DNA survival by almost an order of magnitude.

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