The Scientist

» autism and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

0 Comments

image: Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

By | February 18, 2016

Oligosaccharides found in breast milk stimulate the activity of gut bacteria, promoting growth in two animal models of infant malnutrition.

0 Comments

image: More Mini Brains

More Mini Brains

By | February 17, 2016

Simple versions of brain organoids could serve as new models for testing the effects of drugs, researchers reported at this year’s AAAS meeting. 

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

0 Comments

image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

10 Comments

image: Infection-Autism Link Explained?

Infection-Autism Link Explained?

By | January 31, 2016

A mouse study suggests a mechanism by which severe infections during pregnancy increase autism risk. 

0 Comments

image: Engineered Monkeys Could Aid Autism Research

Engineered Monkeys Could Aid Autism Research

By | January 27, 2016

Monkeys genetically engineered with multiple copies of an autism-linked human gene display some autism-like behaviors, scientists show.

1 Comment

image: $280 Million Boost for Disease Genomics

$280 Million Boost for Disease Genomics

By | January 18, 2016

The genomics arm of the National Institutes of Health has pledged a total of $280 million for research into the genetic bases of disease.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Trump’s Proposed Budget Would Cut Science Funding
  2. Unstructured Proteins Help Tardigrades Survive Desiccation
  3. Science Advocates Decry Trump’s Proposed Budget
  4. Women Lose Vision After Stem Cell Treatment
Business Birmingham