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» autism, immunology and developmental biology

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

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image: One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

By | August 31, 2016

Host and bacterial ligands that interact with the same cell-surface receptor induce different activities in human macrophages. 

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image: One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

By | August 26, 2016

Precursor T cells bearing the same antigen receptor adopt two different fates in mice.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

By | August 1, 2016

In mice, immune cells from the body cavity surrounding organs arrive at the site of damage to chew up the nuclei of dead cells.

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image: Moving Toward Personalized Autism Treatment

Moving Toward Personalized Autism Treatment

By | August 1, 2016

Researchers aim to leverage new insights into the underlying causes of the disorder to better help patients. 

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image: Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

By | August 1, 2016

Immune cells called macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of mice migrate to injured livers and aid in repair.

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image: The Hormones and Brain Regions Behind Eye Contact

The Hormones and Brain Regions Behind Eye Contact

By | August 1, 2016

Can oxytocin help increase eye contact in patients with autism, thus opening up a whole new world of social interaction?

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