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image: The Genes Underlying Autism Are Coming Into Focus

The Genes Underlying Autism Are Coming Into Focus

By | August 1, 2016

As researchers sequence the DNA of thousands of kids with autism, dozens of genetic subgroups are emerging.

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image: Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

By , , and | July 1, 2016

Understanding interactions between the immune system and stem cells could pave the way for successful stem cell–based regenerative therapies.

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image: Immune Cells' Roles in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

Immune Cells' Roles in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

By , , and | July 1, 2016

The cells of the mammalian immune system do more than just fight off pathogens; they are also important players in stem cell function and are thus crucial for maintaining homeostasis and recovering from injury.

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image: Zika and Dengue Immunity: A Complex Relationship

Zika and Dengue Immunity: A Complex Relationship

By | June 28, 2016

Researchers examine the blood of people infected with dengue virus, finding a few Zika-neutralizing antibodies among mostly enhancing ones.

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image: Sex Differences in Immune Response

Sex Differences in Immune Response

By | June 21, 2016

Female mice lacking an immune receptor are better than males at fighting certain viral infections.

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Mouse pups born to mothers fed a high-fat diet lack a gut microbe that promotes social behavior, scientists show.

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image: Altered Sense of Touch in Autism?

Altered Sense of Touch in Autism?

By | June 10, 2016

A mouse study suggests that disruptions to nerves in the skin may contribute to autism spectrum disorder.

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Another study finds similar gene expression in the brains of people with these disorders.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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