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image: The Genes Underlying Autism Are Coming Into Focus

The Genes Underlying Autism Are Coming Into Focus

By | August 1, 2016

As researchers sequence the DNA of thousands of kids with autism, dozens of genetic subgroups are emerging.

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A 3-D carbon nanotube mesh enables rat spinal tissue sections to reconnect in culture.

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Mismatched ancestral origins of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA boost mouse health.

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image: Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

By , and | July 1, 2016

Understanding interactions between the immune system and stem cells could pave the way for successful stem cell–based regenerative therapies.

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image: Immune Cells' Role in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

Immune Cells' Role in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

By , and | July 1, 2016

The cells of the mammalian immune system do more than just fight off pathogens; they are also important players in stem cell function and are thus crucial for maintaining homeostasis and recovering from injury.

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image: Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

By | June 23, 2016

Running releases an enzyme that is associated with memory function in mice and humans.  

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Mouse pups born to mothers fed a high-fat diet lack a gut microbe that promotes social behavior, scientists show.

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image: Altered Sense of Touch in Autism?

Altered Sense of Touch in Autism?

By | June 10, 2016

A mouse study suggests that disruptions to nerves in the skin may contribute to autism spectrum disorder.

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image: Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

By | June 9, 2016

Researchers repurpose a bacterial immune system to be a molecular recording device.

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Another study finds similar gene expression in the brains of people with these disorders.

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