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» GM crops and developmental biology

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image: Growing Better Biofuel Crops

Growing Better Biofuel Crops

By | July 1, 2012

Research is underway to reduce the use of food crops for biofuels by shifting to dedicated energy crops and agricultural residues.

1 Comment

image: GM Crops Offer Natural Pest Control

GM Crops Offer Natural Pest Control

By | June 13, 2012

Transgenic cotton plants that produce their own insecticide bolster local insect predator populations, which could serve as better long-term solutions to crop pests.

3 Comments

image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

0 Comments

image: GM Crop Field Intruder Arrested

GM Crop Field Intruder Arrested

By | May 22, 2012

A protestor is arrested for trying to break into a field of genetically modified wheat at a UK agricultural research station.

2 Comments

image: Revenge of the Weeds

Revenge of the Weeds

By | May 20, 2012

Plant pests are evolving to outsmart common herbicides, costing farmers crops and money.

33 Comments

image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

2 Comments

image: Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

By | May 1, 2012

From accounts of deformed animals to scratch-and-sniff technology, Robert Boyle's early contributions to the Royal Society of London were prolific and wide ranging.

0 Comments

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