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» GM crops and developmental biology

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image: Eggs Trade Genes

Eggs Trade Genes

By | October 24, 2012

Swapping chromosomes from one human egg to another could eliminate mitochondrial DNA mutations that cause disease.

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image: Cloning Biologist Dies

Cloning Biologist Dies

By | October 12, 2012

Keith Campbell, a biologist who was part of the effort to clone Dolly the sheep, has passed away at the age of 58.

1 Comment

image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

image: Anti-GM Crop Study Gets Audited

Anti-GM Crop Study Gets Audited

By | September 25, 2012

European agencies will evaluate a recent study that links genetically modified corn to early death.

3 Comments

image: GM Crop Concerns

GM Crop Concerns

By | September 20, 2012

A questionable study claims that rats fed approved genetically modified maize developed cancer and died early.

13 Comments

image: Proteinaceous Cassava Lacks Protein

Proteinaceous Cassava Lacks Protein

By | September 19, 2012

A PLOS ONE study claiming to have jacked up the essential crop with a gene to allow the plant to produce protein is retracted.

4 Comments

image: Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

By | September 17, 2012

Mice raised in isolation from their mothers developed cognitive deficits similar to those of babies raised in orphanages where physical contact is infrequent.

2 Comments

image: GM Rice Scandal?

GM Rice Scandal?

By | September 12, 2012

Researchers studying the effects of genetically modified golden rice on schoolchildren in China are accused of unethical behavior.

9 Comments

image: A Win for GM Crops

A Win for GM Crops

By | September 10, 2012

The EU Court of Justice struck down Italy’s attempt to block genetically modified maize.

1 Comment

image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

0 Comments

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