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image: Sage Pulls More Papers for Fake Peer Review

Sage Pulls More Papers for Fake Peer Review

By | August 20, 2015

The publisher is retracting 17 articles because of tampering with the peer-review process.

1 Comment

image: Bacteria to Blame?

Bacteria to Blame?

By | August 18, 2015

T cells activated in the microbe-dense gut can spark an autoimmune eye disease, a study shows. 

2 Comments

image: Citation Payola?

Citation Payola?

By | August 18, 2015

A transgenic mouse company is paying researchers who mention its animal models in scientific papers.

1 Comment

image: BMC Revises Retraction

BMC Revises Retraction

By | August 13, 2015

BioMed Central updates a retraction notice issued in March after finding out the authors did not influence the peer-review process.

0 Comments

image: The Search for Persisters

The Search for Persisters

By | August 11, 2015

Lyme disease–causing bacteria can outmaneuver antibiotics in vitro and manipulate the mouse immune system.

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image: Publishing Partners

Publishing Partners

By | August 10, 2015

Collaborations can boost citations, a study shows.

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image: Subway Microbiome Study Revised

Subway Microbiome Study Revised

By | August 4, 2015

Researchers tone down their highly publicized study that reported the presence of deadly pathogens on New York City subways.

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image: TB Traces

TB Traces

By | August 1, 2015

Take a trip to the mummy museum in Vác, Hungary, to see the human remains that helped researchers learn more about the origins of tuberculosis in Europe.

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image: Anthrax Sent in Error to 86 Labs

Anthrax Sent in Error to 86 Labs

By | July 29, 2015

A US Army lab shipped live spores of the deadly bacterium because of improper irradiation protocols, a Department of Defense review has found.

1 Comment

image: Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness

Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness

By | July 22, 2015

In some pathogenic bacteria, certain antibiotic resistance–associated mutations may also confer an unexpected growth advantage.

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