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image: Texan West Nile Concerns

Texan West Nile Concerns

By | August 27, 2012

Researchers consider the recent reappearance of West Nile virus in Texas and the efforts to control it.

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image: Cancer-Causing Gut Bacteria

Cancer-Causing Gut Bacteria

By | August 17, 2012

Mice with inflammatory bowel disease harbor gut bacteria that damage host DNA, predisposing mice to cancer.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: OA Coming of Age

Opinion: OA Coming of Age

By | August 6, 2012

Open-access journals are reaching the same quality levels as their subscription counterparts.

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image: ArXiv Attracts Biologists

ArXiv Attracts Biologists

By | August 1, 2012

Life scientists are increasingly posting manuscripts to the preprint server, joining the ranks of thousands of physicists.

1 Comment

Contributors

August 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Bring On the Transparency Index

Bring On the Transparency Index

By | August 1, 2012

Grading journals on how well they share information with readers will help deliver accountability to an industry that often lacks it.

6 Comments

image: Predatory Publishing

Predatory Publishing

By | August 1, 2012

Overzealous open-access advocates are creating an exploitative environment, threatening the credibility of scholarly publishing.

29 Comments

image: Survival of the Fittest (to print)

Survival of the Fittest (to print)

By | August 1, 2012

Science publishing is locked in an evolutionary arms race as it edges further into the digital age.

5 Comments

image: Whither Science Publishing?

Whither Science Publishing?

By | August 1, 2012

As we stand on the brink of a new scientific age, how researchers should best communicate their findings and innovations is hotly debated in the publishing trenches.

18 Comments

image: Modeling the Cell

Modeling the Cell

By | July 23, 2012

The first full computer model of a single-celled organism mimics the bacterium’s behaviors and paves the way to more complete disease models.

2 Comments

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