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image: Karolinska Finds Macchiarini Guilty of Misconduct

Karolinska Finds Macchiarini Guilty of Misconduct

By | December 22, 2016

The embattled thoracic surgeon is dealt another blow by his former employer, which is calling for the retraction of one of his papers on artificial esophagus research.

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image: Top 10 Retractions of 2016

Top 10 Retractions of 2016

By | December 21, 2016

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

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image: Speaking of Science: 2016

Speaking of Science: 2016

By | December 19, 2016

Selected quotes from an eventful year

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image: Elsevier’s Answer to the Impact Factor

Elsevier’s Answer to the Impact Factor

By | December 9, 2016

“CiteScore,” which ranks twice as many journals compared with publications assigned impact factors, makes its debut during a contentious time for journal metrics.

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Scientists present evidence of bacteria-driven mating in flagellate eukaryotes at the American Society for Cell Biology annual meeting.

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image: Phages Carry Antibiotic Resistance Genes

Phages Carry Antibiotic Resistance Genes

By | December 8, 2016

Researchers find evidence of antibiotic resistance genes in the DNA of viruses that infect bacteria.

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image: Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

By | December 1, 2016

Bacteria in the intestine influence motor dysfunction and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | December 1, 2016

The importance of science innovation, publishing and gender, and more

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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A new literature review finds that even if babies born via Cesarean section have long-term health risks, as a number of past studies purport, it may not be a result of the procedure itself.

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