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image: Opinion: Repairing Peer Review

Opinion: Repairing Peer Review

By | November 18, 2016

Peer review is in crisis, but should be fixed, not abolished.

2 Comments

image: AI Lends Computing Power to Academic Search Engines

AI Lends Computing Power to Academic Search Engines

By | November 15, 2016

A tool that uses machine learning algorithms to comb and categorize the scientific literature is making waves in neuroscience.

0 Comments

image: Publisher Retracts Dozens of Studies

Publisher Retracts Dozens of Studies

By | November 1, 2016

Springer Nature pulls 58 articles in one fell swoop, citing plagiarism and authorship manipulation, among other things.

1 Comment

image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

4 Comments

image: The Human Virome

The Human Virome

By | November 1, 2016

Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Stop Submitting Papers

Opinion: Stop Submitting Papers

By | October 13, 2016

This is not sustainable.

1 Comment

image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

4 Comments

image: Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

By | October 1, 2016

Bacteria inhabit most tissues in the human body, and genes from some of these microbes have made their way to the human genome. Could this genetic transfer contribute to diseases such as cancer?

3 Comments

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