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image: Predatory Journal Biz Booming

Predatory Journal Biz Booming

By | October 5, 2015

Scientific publishers with questionable standards raked in about $75 million and published more than 400,000 articles last year, according to a new analysis.

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image: Microbiome Meals

Microbiome Meals

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers identify a handful of genes that help bacteria in the mouse gut adapt to dietary changes.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Cultural Riches

Cultural Riches

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers devise new techniques to facilitate growing bacteria collected from the environment.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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Speaking of Science

By | October 1, 2015

October 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: Lost Colonies

Lost Colonies

By | October 1, 2015

Next-generation sequencing has identified scores of new microorganisms, but getting even abundant bacterial species to grow in the lab has proven challenging.

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image: Mislabeled Genomes to be Fixed

Mislabeled Genomes to be Fixed

By | September 29, 2015

Conference elicits buzz about the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s efforts to clean up genome entries.         

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image: TS Picks: September 29, 2015

TS Picks: September 29, 2015

By | September 29, 2015

Detailing publication contributions; mining human connectomes; all about mutations

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image: Data “Overflow” Compromising Science?

Data “Overflow” Compromising Science?

By | September 25, 2015

According to a new study, the deluge of scientific literature is leaving researchers unsure of which information to trust.

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