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image: Neurons from Glia In Vivo

Neurons from Glia In Vivo

By | October 19, 2015

Scientists present new recipes for directly converting glial cells to neurons in mouse brains.

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image: Crystal Unclear

Crystal Unclear

By | October 15, 2015

A behind-the-scenes look at how researchers solved the high-resolution crystal structure of the nucleosome core particle raises the age-old question of assigning credit in science.

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image: Brain Activity Identifies Individuals

Brain Activity Identifies Individuals

By | October 12, 2015

Neural connectome patterns differ enough between people to use them as a fingerprint.

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image: Debating the Value of Anonymity

Debating the Value of Anonymity

By | October 5, 2015

PubPeer responds to criticism that anonymous post-publication peer review threatens the scientific process.

1 Comment

image: Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

By | October 5, 2015

Researchers have selectively activated a specific neural pathway to manipulate a primate’s behavior.

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image: Predatory Journal Biz Booming

Predatory Journal Biz Booming

By | October 5, 2015

Scientific publishers with questionable standards raked in about $75 million and published more than 400,000 articles last year, according to a new analysis.

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image: Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Brain

Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Neuron nurseries in the adult brains of rodents and humans appear to influence cognitive function.

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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

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image: Closing the Loop

Closing the Loop

By | October 1, 2015

Micromanaging neuronal behavior with optogenetics

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image: Sugar Coma Model

Sugar Coma Model

By | October 1, 2015

How glucose fires up sleep-inducing neurons

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