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image: PLOS Clarifies Data Policy

PLOS Clarifies Data Policy

By | March 11, 2014

Following the publisher’s announcement of an updated policy for the sharing of data underlying its open-access publications, PLOS apologizes for the confusion.

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image: Call for STAP Retractions

Call for STAP Retractions

By | March 11, 2014

One of the scientists behind the stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency studies, which independent groups have had trouble reproducing, has requested that the papers be pulled from the literature.

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

By | March 3, 2014

The development of serrated polyps depends on bacteria present in the gut, a mouse study shows.  

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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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image: Week in Review: February 24–28

Week in Review: February 24–28

By | February 28, 2014

New PLOS data sharing rules; mouse cortical connectome published; reprogramming astrocytes into neurons and fibroblasts into hepatocytes

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image: A Wine Bacterium’s Proteome

A Wine Bacterium’s Proteome

By | February 26, 2014

Scientists map the partial proteome of a common lactic acid bacterium.

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image: Report: Diversity Strengthens Publications

Report: Diversity Strengthens Publications

By | February 25, 2014

US scientists are more likely to coauthor papers with researchers of similar ethnicity to themselves, but manuscripts with a more diverse list of authors have greater impact, a study shows.

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image: Opinion: Measuring Impact

Opinion: Measuring Impact

By | February 24, 2014

Scientists must find a way to estimate the seemingly immeasurable impact of their research efforts.

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image: How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

By | February 20, 2014

Researchers reveal the molecular mechanisms of Streptomyces platensis’s defense from its own antibiotics, which inhibit fatty acid synthesis in other microbes.

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