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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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image: One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

By | April 5, 2016

Certain immune cells surrounding the organ appear to block viral entry.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2016

April 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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image: TS Picks: March 15, 2016

TS Picks: March 15, 2016

By | March 15, 2016

Profile of a CRISPR pioneer; SciHub, open access, and for-profit publishing; improving ecological models

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image: More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

By | March 8, 2016

A second study finds evidence that feeding children peanuts could help prevent them from developing allergies to the legume later in life.

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image: Paper Containing Creationist Language Pulled

Paper Containing Creationist Language Pulled

By | March 7, 2016

PLOS ONE says a breakdown in the peer-review process led to the publication of a now-retracted biomechanics paper that made reference to a “Creator.”

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image: Future Fields of Inquiry

Future Fields of Inquiry

By | March 7, 2016

Researchers propose an approach to identify new multidisciplinary interests in the sciences.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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