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image: Lost in Translation

Lost in Translation

By | July 16, 2013

Failure to translate preclinical research to humans may be due in part to biased reporting.

4 Comments

image: Opinion: Rethinking Scientific Evaluation

Opinion: Rethinking Scientific Evaluation

By | July 16, 2013

Asymmetry in the Research Excellence Framework in the U.K. is a threat to basic medical sciences within British medical schools.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

0 Comments

image: Editor Quits After Fraud Allegations

Editor Quits After Fraud Allegations

By | July 10, 2013

Dmitry Kuznetsov, former chief editor of two science journals, denies any wrongdoing, but agrees to leave his posts after The Scientist reported on numerous accusations of misconduct.

4 Comments

image: Week in Review, July 1–5

Week in Review, July 1–5

By | July 5, 2013

Fraudulent journal editor?; fat cells detect temp, generate heat; the importance of social media in science communication; functional livers from iPSCs; antibiotics damage mitochondria

0 Comments

image: Accused “Fraudster” Heads Two Journals

Accused “Fraudster” Heads Two Journals

By | July 2, 2013

A Russian researcher suspected of multiple counts of fakery is chief editor of two scientific publications.

1 Comment

In Chapter 3, “From Mating to Conception,” author Robert Martin explores the question of why humans and other primates frequently engage in sexual intercourse when females are not fertile.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2013

Denial, Probably Approximately Correct, Permanent Present Tense, and Against Their Will

0 Comments

image: Widening the Fertile Window

Widening the Fertile Window

By | July 1, 2013

Women may be able to store viable sperm for longer than a week, thus contributing to apparent variability in pregnancy lengths.

1 Comment

image: The Art of Science

The Art of Science

By | June 21, 2013

Princeton scientists and engineers create a stunning collection of scientific images better suited for a gallery than a lab meeting.

2 Comments

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