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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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image: Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

By | August 31, 2016

A commercially available glioblastoma cell line appears to be from a different source than its stated origins.

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image: US Gov't Takes On Predatory Publishers

US Gov't Takes On Predatory Publishers

By | August 29, 2016

The Federal Trade Commission has filed a legal complaint against the OMICS Group for allegedly engaging in deceptive practices.

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image: More Preprints

More Preprints

By | August 15, 2016

A new chemistry-centric preprint server is slated to launch.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Seven Skeletons</em>

Book Excerpt from Seven Skeletons

By | August 1, 2016

In Chapter 1, “The Old Man of La Chapelle: The Patriarch of Paleo,” author Lydia Pyne explains the public's evolving conception of the first complete Neanderthal skeleton found and described by scientists.

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By ditching traditional agar-based media, two biochemists captured iconic images of Myxococcus in 1982.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | August 1, 2016

Brexit's effect on science, melding disciplines, and more

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image: Opinion: A Baseball Analogy

Opinion: A Baseball Analogy

By | July 26, 2016

Stiff competition under the current biomedical publishing model prevents important work from reaching a wider community in a timely manner. 

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image: Opinion: Two Steps Toward Establishing Priority of Discovery

Opinion: Two Steps Toward Establishing Priority of Discovery

By | July 19, 2016

Establishing priority of a new finding is best achieved through a combination of a rapid, scientist-controlled disclosure followed by subsequent validation, through journal-based peer review and other mechanisms.

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