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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: PubMed-Indexed Abstracts to Include COI Statements

PubMed-Indexed Abstracts to Include COI Statements

By | April 19, 2017

Expressions of concern will also be linked in study summaries. 

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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In a preprint, a PhD student examines freely available SciHub usage data.

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image: TS Picks: April 7, 2017

TS Picks: April 7, 2017

By | April 7, 2017

Consortium pushes for open citation data; Gates Foundation launches open-access publishing platform; Cell Press lifts the veil on papers under consideration; an online widget circumvents some paywalls

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image: Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

By | April 6, 2017

My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

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image: SCOPUS Dumps OMICS Journals

SCOPUS Dumps OMICS Journals

By | March 29, 2017

A database of scientific journal titles has removed several OMICS titles for “publication concerns.”

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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image: Opinion: On “The Impact Factor Fallacy”

Opinion: On “The Impact Factor Fallacy”

By , , and | March 21, 2017

Papers published in low-impact journals are not necessarily low-quality scientific contributions.

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image: Qualities Tied to Potential Scientific Bias

Qualities Tied to Potential Scientific Bias

By | March 21, 2017

Overestimation of effect sizes in meta-analyses is linked with early-career status, small collaborations, or misconduct records, according to a study.

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  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

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