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image: Study: Transparency Lacking in Biomedical Literature

Study: Transparency Lacking in Biomedical Literature

By | January 4, 2016

Few authors make their full data available and most published papers do not clearly state funding sources and conflicts of interest.

3 Comments

image: Immune-Boosting Protein Study Questioned

Immune-Boosting Protein Study Questioned

By | December 23, 2015

Science adds an editorial expression of concern to an already-corrected study on a protein reported to spur T-cell proliferation in mice.

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image: The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

By | December 23, 2015

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

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image: Trending Positively

Trending Positively

By | December 16, 2015

Analyzing three decades’ worth of PubMed-indexed abstracts, scientists find a notable increase in the frequency of positive words, such as “innovative” and “novel,” over time.

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image: TS Picks: December 14, 2015

TS Picks: December 14, 2015

By | December 14, 2015

New PhDs boost economy; Dutch universities strike open-access deal with Elsevier; #scibucketlist

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image: TS Picks: December 3, 2015

TS Picks: December 3, 2015

By | December 3, 2015

Inducing brain infections to cure cancer?; new journal publishes bit science; priming the brain for language learning

1 Comment

image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Gambling on Reproducibility

Gambling on Reproducibility

By | November 10, 2015

New research finds that observers placing bets in a stock exchange–like environment are pretty good at predicting the replicability of psychology studies.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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