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image: Opinion: Senior Scientists Should Be Writing

Opinion: Senior Scientists Should Be Writing

By | April 7, 2015

Three reasons why authorship matters, even—perhaps especially—to established scholars

6 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Fast-Track Peer Review Controversy

Fast-Track Peer Review Controversy

By | March 31, 2015

An editor of the journal Scientific Reports quits in protest of paid, expedited review.

4 Comments

image: Mass Retraction

Mass Retraction

By | March 27, 2015

BioMed Central retracts 43 papers it had been investigating for evidence of faked peer review.

1 Comment

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: HHS Rolls Out Public Access Plans

HHS Rolls Out Public Access Plans

By | March 3, 2015

The US Department of Health and Human Services outlines how the National Institutes of Health and its other agencies will make research results public.

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image: Riding Out Rejection

Riding Out Rejection

By | March 1, 2015

How to navigate the choppy waters of scientific publication

9 Comments

image: <em>Nature</em> Debuts Peer-Review Option

Nature Debuts Peer-Review Option

By | February 18, 2015

Authors submitting to Nature journals can soon request double-blind reviews.

1 Comment

image: Truly Brief Communications

Truly Brief Communications

By | February 18, 2015

The Journal of Brief Ideas, a platform that publishes 200-word articles, launches in beta.

1 Comment

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