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image: Bird Flu Research to Resume

Bird Flu Research to Resume

By | January 24, 2013

After a year-long voluntary moratorium to discuss regulations and safety measures, scientists are set to resume controversial H5N1 research.

1 Comment

image: Cancer Diet Shared by Healthy Cells

Cancer Diet Shared by Healthy Cells

By | January 23, 2013

Tumor cells rapidly divide by usurping a metabolic trick from normal cell development.


image: Some Insurers Protected by GINA

Some Insurers Protected by GINA

By | January 23, 2013

Long-term, life, and disability insurers may still be able to deny coverage to patients with a genetic disease, under current nondiscrimination legislation.


image: Cheap Impact?

Cheap Impact?

By | January 23, 2013

A new online tool allows researchers to compare open-access journal publication fees with article influence, and reveals that you don’t necessarily get what you pay for.


image: Mathematicians as Publishers

Mathematicians as Publishers

By | January 21, 2013

A new initiative in the mathematics research community is gearing up to do the work traditionally organized by a publisher.


image: First Recombinant Flu Vaccine

First Recombinant Flu Vaccine

By | January 21, 2013

The US Food and Drug Administration approves the first flu vaccine made from recombinant proteins rather than a weakened virus.

1 Comment

image: Dung Defeats Drugs

Dung Defeats Drugs

By | January 18, 2013

Fecal transplants outcompeted traditional antibiotics at curing a deadly intestinal infection.


image: Renowned Retraction

Renowned Retraction

By | January 16, 2013

Authors retract a decade-old, highly-cited cancer study, admitting sloppy mistakes in the data analysis.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Publish Negative Results

Opinion: Publish Negative Results

By , and | January 15, 2013

Non-confirmatory or “negative” results are not worthless.


image: Bespoke Stem Cells for Brain Disease

Bespoke Stem Cells for Brain Disease

By | January 15, 2013

Scientists use virus-free gene therapy on patient-derived stem cells to repair spinal muscular atrophy in mice.


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