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image: New <em>Science</em> Journal to Launch

New Science Journal to Launch

By | February 12, 2014

The American Association for the Advancement of Science, publisher of the journal Science, announces plans for a new digital open-access publication, Science Advances.

1 Comment

image: Researchers Read Fewer Papers

Researchers Read Fewer Papers

By | February 5, 2014

A new survey shows that scientists are perusing the literature less now than they have annually for 35 years.

1 Comment

image: NIH Tackles Irreproducibility

NIH Tackles Irreproducibility

By | January 28, 2014

The federal agency speaks out about how to improve the quality of scientific research.

5 Comments

image: The HHMI Bump

The HHMI Bump

By | January 28, 2014

A new study shows a slight citation benefit to authors recently awarded investigator status from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

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image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus

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image: New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

By | January 21, 2014

A virus that causes blight in plants may contribute the catastrophic decline of honeybee colonies.

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image: Older Trees Grow Faster

Older Trees Grow Faster

By | January 20, 2014

Mature trees soak up more CO2 than younger ones, a study shows, overturning a bit of botanical dogma.

3 Comments

image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.

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image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.

5 Comments

image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.

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