The Scientist

» science publishing and ecology

Most Recent

image: Expensive Retraction

Expensive Retraction

By | January 2, 2013

A publisher bills authors $650 to retract a twice-published paper.

2 Comments

image: Fighting Microbes with Microbes

Fighting Microbes with Microbes

By | January 1, 2013

Doctors turn to good microbes to fight disease. Will the same strategy work with crops?

6 Comments

image: Limber LIMS

Limber LIMS

By | January 1, 2013

Using laboratory information management systems (LIMS) to automate and streamline laboratory tasks: three case studies

1 Comment

image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

1 Comment

image: Elsevier Hacked, Papers Retracted

Elsevier Hacked, Papers Retracted

By | December 12, 2012

Fake peer reviews were submitted to Elsevier due to a glitch in the publisher's security system, resulting in the retraction of 11 papers.

1 Comment

image: Old Ocean Mold

Old Ocean Mold

By | December 12, 2012

Fungi in 100 million year-old seafloor sediments could possess novel antibiotics.

0 Comments

image: Marlboro Chicks

Marlboro Chicks

By | December 5, 2012

Two species of songbirds pack their nests with scavenged cigarette butts that repel irksome parasites.

1 Comment

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Coughing Seashells

Coughing Seashells

By | November 28, 2012

A type of scallop expels water and waste through a sort of cough that could reveal clues about water quality.

1 Comment

image: Beetles Warm BC Forests

Beetles Warm BC Forests

By | November 27, 2012

Using satellite data, researchers calculate that mountain pine beetle infestations raise summertime temperatures in British Columbia’s pine forests by 1 degree Celsius.

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. The Neanderthal in the Mirror
    Reading Frames The Neanderthal in the Mirror

    Our evolutionary cousin is no longer a blundering caveman. Recent research has painted a picture of a human ancestor with culture, art, and advanced cognitive skills.

  2. New Lyme Disease Test Developed by Summer Student
  3. Student Alleges His Team Didn’t Earn CRISPR Patent
  4. Zika Infects Adult Neural Progenitors Too
RayBiotech